Day of The Dead Linoleum Block Print

 

"Posada and Catrina"
“Posada and Catrina”

After looking at the work of Jose’ Posada and the tradition “Day of the Dead”, brainstorm a list of activities in your community that involve you.

Through the class discussion think about  what you contribute to your community to keep it healthy? What is your special talent? What do you hope to be doing until you die in your family and civic life? What do people need to know that they might not know about you?

Posada was known for creating satirical images suggesting more than what was seen on the surface. Choose a topic that has layers of understanding.

Complete sketches of at least three different ideas in your sketchbook. Make notes about the back story to your images. Choose one of them to develop into a detailed composition intended for linoleum block printing. Trace a square in your sketchbook to work within. Send an email to your Instructor proposing the reasons for your topic and your intentions in completing this work. See whiteboard for criteria.

A 12″x 12″(or there about) block will be provided for the final lino-carving. Artwork may need to be re sized using the copy machine once the composition is decided and completed. Revise the drawing so the image is a black and white design with variation of the texture, line and shapes.

Transfer the artwork to the block using carbon paper. After the “Safety” demonstration you may begin to carve the linoleum block.

Print 4 copies of the print on white print paper. Sign, number and date. Your grade will reflect the composition of the finished print, quality of the carving and technique of the printing process.

Write one paragraph about the theme of your linoleum block print. Revisit why you choose this topic? Does it still mean the same thing to you? How do you intend to make this a part of your life until you die? What do people need to know that they might not know about you based on this linoleum block? How do you see layers of understanding depicted in your print? This essay is to be completed by the end of the project and emailed to colson@isd2142.k12.mn.us

"Cyclists" by Jose Posada
“Cyclists” by Jose Posada

Background Information:

Day of the Dead is an interesting holiday celebrated in central and southern Mexico on November 1 & 2. Even though this coincides with the Catholic holiday called All Soul’s & All Saint’s Day, the indigenous people have combined this with their own ancient beliefs of honoring their deceased loved ones.

They believe that the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31, and the spirits of all deceased children (angelitos) are allowed to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On November 2, the spirits of the adults come down to enjoy the festivities that are prepared for them.

In most Indian villages, beautiful altars (ofrendas) are made in each home. They are decorated with candles, buckets of flowers (wild marigolds called cempasuchil & bright red cock’s combs) mounds of fruit, peanuts, plates of turkey mole, stacks of tortillas and big Day-of-the-Dead breads called pan de muerto. The altar needs to have lots of food, bottles of soda, hot cocoa and water for the weary spirits. Toys and candies are left for the angelitos, and on Nov. 2, cigarettes and shots of mezcal are offered to the adult spirits. Little folk art skeletons and sugar skulls, purchased at open-air markets, provide the final touches.

On the afternoon of Nov. 2, the festivities are taken to the cemetery. People clean tombs, play cards, listen to the village band and reminisce about their loved ones. Tradition keeps the village close. Day of the Dead is becoming very popular increasingly popular in the U.S.~ perhaps because we don’t have a way to celebrate and honor our dead, or maybe it’s because of our fascination with it’s mysticism.  http://www.mexicansugarskull.com/support/dodhistory.html


José Guadalupe Posada
 (February 2, 1852 – January 20, 1913) was a Mexican cartoonist illustrator and artist whose work has influenced many Latin American artists and cartoonists because of its satirical acuteness and political engagement.

Posada’s best known works are his calaveras, which often assume various costumes, such as the Calavera de la Catrina, the “Skull of the Female Dandy”, which was meant to satirize the life of the upper classes during the reign of Porfirio Díaz. Most of his imagery was meant to make a religious or satirical point. Since his death, however, his images have become associated with the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, the “Day of the Dead”.

José Guadalupe Posada (February 2, 1852 – January 20, 1913[1]) was a Mexican cartoonist illustrator and artist whose work has influenced many Latin Americanartists and cartoonists because of its satirical acuteness and political engagement.

Posada’s best known works are his calaveras, which often assume various costumes, such as the Calavera de la Catrina, the “Skull of the Female Dandy”, which was meant to satirize the life of the upper classes during the reign of Porfirio Díaz. Most of his imagery was meant to make a religious or satirical point. Since his death, however, his images have become associated with the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos, the “Day of the Dead”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Guadalupe_Posada

 

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